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Author Archives: Adams & Martin Group

2017’s New Marijuana Laws

A White Paper with Tips for California Employers

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This entry was posted in Business Clients, White Papers by .

Defined as the “Legal Haze,” the new laws regulating marijuana usage may make employers feel like they are in a weird place, unsure of the role the new law will play in their workplace.

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Adams & Martin Group’s Parent Company Named a “2017 Best Staffing Firm to Work For” and a “2017 Best Staffing Firm to Temp for” by Staffing Industry Analysts

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This entry was posted in Awards by .

For the seventh consecutive year, Roth Staffing Companies, L.P. (the parent company of Adams & Martin Group) has been named a “2017 Best Staffing Firm to Work For” and this is the fourth year they’ve been named a “2017 Best Staffing Firm to Temp For” by Staffing Industry Continue reading

Gen-Whenever: Recruiting & Retaining the 3 Generations

A WHITE PAPER PROVIDED BY ADAMS & MARTIN GROUP

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This entry was posted in Business Clients, White Papers by .

Curmudgeonly Boomers, Skeptical Xers, Entitled Millennials – even a few Traditionalists and members of Gen Z – all occupy the legal industry working population.

A multigenerational workforce brings diverse viewpoints, differing skill sets, and a mix of experience and eagerness. But finding and managing this extraordinary talent is not successful without strategy.

That diversity comes with its own challenges. In order to cultivate the benefits of an age-diverse workplace, you must recruit fairly and with intention and then continue to foster an engaging environment of understanding.

T-T-Talking ‘bout my Generation

Three generations make up almost all of the workforce: (dates vary according to the source, but generally speaking)

Baby Boomers (born from 1946 to 1964)

  • Optimistic
  • Teamwork and cooperation
  • Ambitious
  • Workaholic

Generation X (born from 1965 to 1980)

  • Skeptical
  • Self-reliant
  • Risk-taking
  • Balances work and personal life

Millennials (born from 1981 to 2000)

  • Hopeful
  • Meaningful work
  • Diversity and change valued
  • Technology savvy

(American Psychological Association)

These stereotypes serve as a quick fix for understanding. However, the New Kids on the Block, the forgotten Middle Children, and the “get off my lawn” Elders can often be mischaracterized. Shared experience leads to similar characteristics and behaviors, but they should not dismiss employees as dynamic humans.

Relying too heavily on these can create an implicit bias, leading to unfair and ineffective hiring and management tactics. At worst, these stereotypes can lead to discrimination and/or a failure to understand your employees beyond the dimension of age.

Luckily, while employees of different generations are different, they’re not that different. And there are one-size-fits-all tactics that you can employ that can create a fair and engaging environment for everyone involved.

Attraction

How you find candidates, and how you engage them pre-hire, will affect your age diversity. Make sure you are prepared.

Recruiting

Never under or overestimate a candidate’s ability to find you.

The Online Revolution

Finding and being found by age-diverse candidates requires presence. According to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), 54% of Americans researched jobs online, and 45% have applied for a job online – more than double the number in 2005. All ages are continuing the migration into the digital age.

When creating an online job posting, your language will make all the difference. Be aware of age-discriminating phrases, like “recent graduates” or “old-school.”

In addition to the basics of the position, include information about internal practices and cultural fit, candidly and objectively. Be honest about workplace practices and culture – not everyone is looking for a ping pong table and casual attire.

Once they see your online job posting, they are likely going to check your website and social media pages. Prepare your website to greet them – begin with updating your website with the most accurate information about your organization, including cultural practices.

But don’t stop on the desktop level. According to Indeed, all three generations utilize mobile devices in their job search.

You don’t necessarily need a custom app, but you do need to ensure that your website and respective job postings across platforms are mobile-friendly. Make sure to test your mobile-capability for yourself from the jobseeker’s point of view.

Jobseekers are also likely to look to your social media pages to get a better feel for your company, especially sites like Glassdoor and LinkedIn. Currently, social media use expands to all generations.

% of US Adults who use at least one social media site:

Age 18 -29: 86%

Age 30-49: 80%

Age 50-64: 64%

Age 65+: 34%

[Pew]

Even if they do not have an active profile on that site, jobseekers will be able to see those pages via a Google search. They will look to your Facebook, Glassdoor, LinkedIn, and Instagram pages for more information and a candid look inside. Actively update and maintain your social media pages, and make sure your organization’s values and culture shines through, and gives an accurate and honest look into your workplace.

Some Things Never Go Out of Style…

However, online techniques, while easier, may alienate older candidates or those without regular internet access. If you are only receiving attention from a certain age group, this technique may not be fair. Be sure to utilize more “traditional” methods of recruiting, including job fairs, referrals, and print ads. Partnering with an organization like Adams & Martin Group can ensure a wider influence and a fairer candidate audience, and efficiently fill a position.

Interviewing

Interviews are your first opportunity to broaden your understanding of a candidate.

In interviewing, once again, be wary of language. It’s not illegal to ask how old someone is, but it can make them feel uncomfortable.

Avoid phrases like these, some of them are rude, some are illegal:

  1. How old are you?
  2. You’re overqualified.
  3. When do you plan on retiring?
  4. In my experience, Boomers/Xers/ Millennials are…
  5. You have too much energy/not enough energy.
  6. Do you have children? Do you plan to?
  7. Do you think you’re old enough to handle this responsibility?
  8. We know young people tend to job hop…
  9. When did you graduate?
  10. What’s your childcare arrangement?

Good thing there are plenty of other things to discuss in an interview. All jobseekers want to know more about your organization. The interview is your chance to dazzle them as well. Regardless of age, jobseekers want fair pay, comprehensive benefits, and a complementary work culture. Throw these conversation topics around like confetti.

Don’t assume that only candidates of a certain age group are interested in certain programs. Lay out all programs and allow for plenty of questions.

In a survey of more than 200 HR professionals, 90% of respondents rated recruiting for culture fit as “very important” to “essential.” Be sure to include culture-based questions and provide honest information about the culture. Don’t skew perceptions of your culture based on the candidate. Make sure their first day – and career – will be everything it’s promised to be.

As you get to know candidates, remember that age can limit exposure to certain practices and experiences. However, you can teach skills (to an extent), you can’t teach culture fit. Your organization’s values know no age. If a candidate is a stellar culture fit, don’t pass them over – no one is too young or old to learn anything.

Before, after, and during the interview, take moments of self-assessment: am I making fair inferences? You can fight stereotypes simply by reflecting on any biases. If you feel as though you cannot interview fairly, it’s best to ask for assistance.

Retention

Once you have recruited this fabulous, culturally sound, age-diverse workforce, dedicated practices will keep them engaged and turnover low. Involved, passionate employees are more productive, more profitable, and build your organization’s culture. Engaged workers consistently outperform non-engaged employees. They provide better service to your customers, remain loyal longer, and are better teammates.

However, it’s unrealistic to have custom policies for certain coworkers. Fortunately, engaging programs and policies know no age limit.

According to Quantum Workplace, while there are many factors of engagement, they can be narrowed down to three themes:

  • Confidence in Leadership
  • The Organization’s Commitment to Valuing Employees
  • Positive Outlook on the Future

This research coincides with our own internal research for employee engagement. We found the 3 main drivers of employee engagement to be:

  • “I have confidence in my leaders’ directions and decisions”
  • “Work culture brings out the best in me”
  • “[The organization] is interested in my growth and development”

Engagement is crucial for all employees, but there is no quick fix. However, the practices you implement will contribute to that engagement.

Programs will serve as the base, but engagement is solidified though everyday efforts and interactions. Active efforts of inclusion go beyond the diversity of representation and create cohesive, efficient, and dynamic teams.

Implement

These programs can cater to all employees while serving their unique needs.

Pay & Benefits

Employees cannot even begin to look towards engagement if their most basic needs are not met. Provide comprehensive benefits and be sure to calculate salaries objectively, focusing on experience and skill rather than age. To ensure fairness, check out our 2017 Salary Guide here.

Moderate Stress

All people have an optimal stress point, where an individual has enough stress to be motivated but not so much that they become overwhelmed. Boomers are more likely to occupy senior leadership roles and be overwhelmed, while Millennials in entry level jobs may not have enough. Create an open dialogue and share responsibilities to moderate stress.

Mentor Programs

Your employees have a lot to learn from one another. Create mentor and reverse mentor programs to increase exposure and teamwork. Retention is 25% higher for employees who have engaged in company-sponsored mentoring. (Deloitte)

Lead with Transparency

Transparent leadership and practices promote fairness, reduce jealousy, and boost connectedness.

Structured Career Paths

Regardless of where they are in their careers, there are always opportunities for growth. Amongst engaged employees, 96% have a clear idea of what is expected of them and 81% say their supervisor takes an interest in their career development (Quantum Workplace). Knowing exactly what is expected of them helps everyone get ahead, and can reduce jealousy and misunderstandings surrounding promotions and growth.

Recognition

Amongst engaged employees, 83% receive recognition for a job well done (Quantum Workplace). It’s not only millennials who want recognition, 50% of employees who don’t feel valued plan to look for another job in the next year. Create a structured program to praise and recognize employees. For more information and tips on recognition, check out our White Paper here.

Ongoing Education and Training

Technology is developing and advancing all the time, be sure coworkers of all ages have the opportunity to learn before they are replaced.

Survey Frequently

Promote a dialogue and survey frequently so employees can voice their opinions and concerns. Survey to understand employees rather than evaluate how you are doing. Then respond appropriately and take action based on those results, do not allow issues to fester. According to TNS Employee Insights, 70% of those employees who are engaged agree that their organization takes action based on survey results.

Mandatory Fun

It’s not mandatory for employees to participate, it’s mandatory for you to create opportunities. Allow for coworkers to intermingle in relaxed environments away from work. This can include happy hours, volunteer efforts, and team competitions. Know that people tend to socially prefer people closer to their own age, so create dedicated efforts to encourage employees to get to know one another.

Maintain

Once those programs are implemented, it’s up to leadership and team managers to create a fair environment. They set the tone and foster day to day collaboration and are champions for inclusion.

Can’t we all just get along?

Raised with different parenting methods, historical events, technological advances, and general experiences, conflict is inevitable – but not insurmountable.

The villain is not time or each other, it’s a lack of communication and understanding. Don’t allow yourself to get absorbed into the stereotypical generational differences, instead focus on the real root of the problem and utilize traditional methods of conflict resolution.

For instance, if an Xer is frustrated with a Millennial’s lack of ability to work independently, the problem is likely not that the Millennial needs constant validation and participation trophies. It is more likely that the Millennial did not receive the training that they needed. Use generational stereotypes to understand, not condemn or dismiss.

Tips from Within

James Sense is a Regional Vice President for Roth Staffing Companies (parent company of Adams & Martin Group). He manages several teams across Southern California, with ages ranging from recent college graduates to some of AMG’s most tenured coworkers. Check out his tips for managing a multigenerational workforce:

“Managing different generations can sometimes be difficult, but I have found that if we learn to recognize strengths within the generations, we can take advantage of these strengths to unite as one unstoppable team. The more we can collaborate, intermixing different generations and viewpoints, the more the teams will learn what the tenured coworkers can offer and the tenured coworkers can learn from the newer coworkers new ideas of doing the same tasks. I think as a manager today, we have to focus on the overall result, not how it gets done.”

The Responsibility of Inclusion

To promote inclusion, keep an eye out for teammates who may be treating other employees unfairly, and promote plenty of teamwork and collaboration. Let employees be their authentic selves, but discourage exclusionary behaviors.

Unite your team towards a common cause. All generations are looking for meaning in their work. A shared purpose goes beyond our understanding of age. To learn more about facilitating a shared purpose, read our White Paper here.


Generational differences are nothing new. We have worked through them in the past and will continue to do so. However, with dedicated efforts and programs, we can make teams even more efficient and effective.

Social Skills: Rules for Facebook

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This entry was posted in Job Seekers, White Papers by .

It’s this new thing called Facebook – ever heard of it? Boasting one billion members, Facebook has become a staple in everyday social life. As the social world expands into the professional world, it’s time to use this social tool to boost your professional life.

While LinkedIn is a more logical choice for professional involvement, Facebook boasts nearly 5 times as many members as LinkedIn, and a higher engagement rate: 70% of Facebook users engage daily vs. only 13% of LinkedIn users (Pew Research). With more members and more frequent use, more opportunities are available. Amongst people who found their current job through a social network, 78% attributed their job to Facebook, while 40% cited assistance from LinkedIn (Jobvite).

Facebook can be a vital tool, not only in your job search, but also in building and strengthening current professional relationships.

However, the tactics required for Facebook professional success differ from casual social use. Check out our recommendations for preparing your profile, expanding your Facebook use in a job search, and maintaining use in your professional life.

Prepare: Are you ready?

It is against Adams & Martin Group’s policy for our own hiring managers to make hiring decisions based on a candidate’s Facebook profile. Correspondingly, we have no social media requirements or expectations for candidates or our Ambassadors. However, it’s possible other organizations might not adhere to the same standard. The information displayed online is simply too tempting. Hiring managers, more likely than not, will check your Facebook. According to Careerbuilder, 60% of recruiters will use social networking sites to research candidates.

The good news is that most recruiters aren’t looking for the “bad stuff”: 60% are looking for information supporting your qualifications, while only 21% are looking for disqualifying behavior (Careerbuilder).

Another source reports more than 40% have reconsidered a candidate based on what they found, and as many as 69% of recruiters say that they have rejected a candidate based on their findings.

Even though a study by the Journal of Management found there was no link between social media and professional behavior, and that recruiter predictions based on social media are often wrong, humans – hiring managers included – cannot always separate judgments logically. What’s on your social media does not define you, but it can influence how hiring managers see you.

The good news is that your Facebook page can also display you in a positive light as well, helping hiring managers can get a more dimensional view of you as a candidate, including potential culture fit.

You need to be prepared for potential employers to look you up, to utilize your current connections, and to reach out to other professionals.

Disclaimer: These are only recommendations for using Facebook for professional use. There are no requirements on your social media behavior. The tips listed are only intended to be helpful, if you choose to use Facebook as a tool.

Privacy, Please

When it comes to Facebook, you can choose how much or how little the public can see. As always, it’s usually best to make your profile completely private. But if you want to be found, you can customize your privacy settings.

You can control who “sees your stuff,” who can contact you, and who can look you up – you can even prevent search engines from linking to your profile. This can help prevent recruiters’ wandering eyes.

privacy-settings

No matter your privacy settings, it’s best to clean up your profile. If this process feels too daunting, consider employing a squeaky-clean scrubbing app like Scrubber or Clear to make controversial content disappear.

Picture Perfect

People can see your profile picture, even if your profile is private. Since this is Facebook, the photo can be more casual than your LinkedIn photo – but it should be a nice photo.

Consider your clothing, background, and other people included in the photo. Double-check your tagged photos and ensure all photos you make visible and add in the future are appropriate.

About Me

In your About section, you can customize any and all information you advertise. Your About section includes your work and education, places you lived, contact and other basic information.

Your work and education will be the most important features in your job search, make sure those details are accurate and up to date.

To access your About section, go to your profile and click About.

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When others click on your About section, they can also see your:

  • Friends
  • Latest photos and videos
  • Places you “checked-in”
  • Pages you’ve liked
  • Events you’ve attended
  • Groups you are a part of (even if they are “closed groups”)
  • And other preferences

These can help build a more well-rounded picture of you as a candidate. But they can also reveal things that you may not bring up in an interview.

Be aware that the pages, groups, and places you’ve been may make recruiters uncomfortable.

Education and Work History

This is pretty self-explanatory, and can be found in the “Work and Education” section, under the “About” tab. Keep this up to date and accurate.

Posting & Liking Habits

When outsiders look at your profile, they can see your status updates, dating as far back as the day you joined Facebook.

According to the Jobvite Recruiter Nation Report 2016, recruiters site these as disqualifiers:

  • Typos – 72%
  • Marijuana – 71%
  • Oversharing – 60%
  • Alcohol – 47%
  • Selfies – 18%

Meanwhile, Careerbuilder states the following as disqualifiers:

  • Provocative or Inappropriate Content – 46%
  • Alcohol and Drugs – 43%
  • Bigoted Content (Race, Religion, Gender, etc.) – 33%
  • Bad-mouthing Previous Company – 31%
  • Poor Communication Skills – 29%

Note: there are ways to prevent individual connections and the public from seeing certain posts – see our Friends section for details.

Unless you specifically select your audience, all the articles you share and thoughts you express are made available. Again, the rule should be: if I wouldn’t share it in an interview, I probably shouldn’t post it publicly.

When deciding what to post, it’s best to follow the 6 B’s:

  1. Better Half: avoid oversharing about your significant other, especially intimate details or photos
  2. Bucks: money is a sensitive subject, complaining or bragging about salary can look unprofessional
  3. Booze + Bud: weekend partying may not portray you in the best professional light. Also, while marijuana laws are changing from state to state, it remains illegal under federal law and worker’s rights under the new laws vary according to location, and may not always lean in your favor
  4. Barack: politics are a volatile topic at the moment – it’s best to avoid them all together.
  5. Battleground: Do not start arguments on Facebook, those discussions are best suited for Messenger. Also, avoid complaining about any current or past jobs
  6. Blades + Blasters: weapon-related posts can make people feel uncomfortable, it’s best to avoid these

Keep these in mind with future posts and when sifting through past posts. Practice good grammar and spelling, and post things that you are proud of, including your accomplishments and activities. Go crazy when it comes to posting, liking, and commenting on professional and industry related topics and pages.

Careerbuilder cites these as the social media information that WILL get you hired:

  • Information Supporting Qualifications – 44%
  • Professional Image – 44%
  • Evidence Personality Fits Company Culture – 43%
  • Wide Range of Interests – 40%
  • Great Communication Skills – 36%

Tips from Within

Victoria Hayes and Valerie Killeen make up the Social Media team at Roth Staffing Companies (parent company of Adams & Martin Group). With experience in social media management and public relations, they are Facebook pros. Check out their tips on getting the most out of Facebook:

“Making sure your profile is appropriate for any professional contacts doesn’t mean ONLY posting professional content, or having a professional headshot as your profile picture—people expect your Facebook to be more laidback than your LinkedIn, and sometimes, pictures of your puppy even attract the most engagement!” says Victoria.

She continues, “However, you may want to think twice before posting photos of your beer bonging last weekend or whining about your latest break-up. Stay away from posting anything that could be construed as discriminatory in anyway. Clean up your act by un-tagging any inappropriate photos, deleting rude or distasteful comments from friends, and un-joining any groups that may not necessarily scream, I’m a professional adult, hire me!”

Outside eyes can also see what your friends post on your timeline. In your privacy settings, you can turn on a setting that allows you to personally approve every post that comes from third parties.

Friends

Before you look to expand your Friends list, look to your current Friends – they can serve as connections or referrals, they can even be checking you out!

Don’t be afraid to lurk on your current Friends’ pages to find out what industries they are in or what jobs they might have. If you are interested in getting involved in their industry or organization, maintain an active relationship with them. Don’t be afraid to reach out and ask for their advice or opinions on changes in the industry. Some may find it off-putting if someone they don’t really know randomly asks them for a job, but most are happy to reconnect and give a helping hand.

If there is anyone in particular you want to impress or if you have posts only intended for a certain audience, you can organize your friends into categories. Go to the menu on the left of your Facebook homepage and select “Friends List.” Categorize your friends to your heart’s desire, particularly setting apart professional connections.

Then when you post, you can select your audience. This can allow you to freely post anything from the 6 B’s!

When you click to update your status, look to the lower right hand corner, and click the drop down arrow. Scroll down to more options, click custom, and there you can customize who you want to share with and/or who you don’t want to share with.

Expand: Utilizing your Facebook for a Job Search

Now that your profile is ready for professional interaction, here are a few tips to expand your usage to help you find new opportunities.

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Valerie recommends beginning with marketing yourself:

“Once you’ve cleaned-up your profile, let your network know that you’re looking for new opportunities… Your friends and family will be apt to help, making recommendations and introductions, and, at the very least, cheering you on! Share periodic updates, to keep your job quest at the top of their feed (and at the top of their mind)

Pro-Tip:  If you’re currently employed and searching confidentially, ensure you’re not sharing these status updates with current coworkers.”

Networking and Alumni Groups

A simple search on Facebook can lead you to a variety of networking and alumni groups. They are likely to post about different job opportunities, and are great places for you to ask about job opportunities. Forge connections with others in the groups, post relevant articles, and pose questions. It is very important to follow the B’s in these groups.

“Like” Company Pages

Companies often post about job openings or internship opportunities on their social media pages—be sure you’re following any companies you especially like to stay in the know. Take it one step further by engaging with their posts.

“As someone who has managed brand pages, it definitely doesn’t go unnoticed when one person consistently comments on or likes the company’s content,” says Victoria. “With this being said, go beyond the obvious like ‘nice’ or ‘love it’ and make sure your comments are thoughtful and worth reading.”

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A knowledge of an organization’s happenings will definitely come in handy during your interview processes. Not only will they recognize your name, but you will have an up to date understanding of the organization and can provide better insight.

Friends & Liking Habits

As you increase your professional connections on Facebook, be wary of your online behavior. While you can filter who sees your posts, there isn’t a way to filter your liking or commenting activity. In their personal newsfeeds, your friends and connections can see everything you like and comment on. Again, if you regularly like and comment on things that fall within the 6 B’s, it might be best to have a fully private profile.

Maintain: Using Facebook in the Workplace

Once you’re hired, your online presence will maintain importance. We don’t recommend checking Facebook at work, but Facebook can be a powerful tool in making and strengthening workplace friendships.

Strong social relationships play a significant role in workplace engagement, and online involvement plays a role in this era of social relationships.

Those with a best friend at work tend to be more focused, more passionate, more productive, and more loyal to their organizations. Facebook can help build those friendships.

Note: You are allowed to reserve Facebook only for yourself, and not utilize it at all in your job search or workplace relationships. If that is the case, it is still a good idea to put your profile on private. It might also be a good idea to let your coworkers know that it is nothing personal, just a preference. Then put forward extra effort in the workplace, like going to lunch or after work Happy Hour.

Engage with their posts and photos (without being inappropriate), and you will soon find that you are learning more about them.

Continue the same practices utilized in preparation and expansion

  • Maintain a work-friendly profile
  • Categorize your friend groups
  • Be wary of posting, commenting, and liking habits

Facebook is more than something to stare at when bored. It can be a powerful tool that can change your professional life – for better or worse. Proactively protect yourself, make a career change, or strengthen your workplace relationships.

Fortune Names Roth Staffing Companies a Top Ten Best Workplace in Texas

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This entry was posted in Awards, News by .

Roth Staffing Companies is proud to do business in Texas, one of the fastest-growing states in the union, and to be ranked #10 out of 50 Best Workplaces in Texas by Fortune Magazine and Great Place to Work.  This includes the specialized business lines of Roth Staffing Companies operating in Texas:  Ultimate Staffing ServicesLedgent Finance & AccountingLedgent TechnologyAdams & Martin Group, and Ultimate Locum Tenens.

The Best Workplaces in Texas are selected based on employees’ assessment of their organizations’ culture, professional development, leadership credibility and other factors. Among more than 100,000 people surveyed at businesses operating in Texas, those at the Best Workplaces gave their companies high marks for creating warm, friendly environments where colleagues truly care about each other and their communities. The winning organizations also out-performed their peers on measures of pride, work-life balance and the fairness of their compensation.

“Although Roth Staffing Companies operates nationwide, the values of our company are particularly aligned with the values of our clients and candidates in the great state of Texas,” says Kristi Kennedy, Senior Vice President at Roth Staffing.  “With 11 branch offices located in the lone-star state, I’m so very proud of the work culture our Texas coworkers have championed.  They not only make life better for the people we serve, but they support and care for each other.  They eagerly participate in our company’s community volunteer initiatives, health challenges, and support the many recognition programs that celebrate their coworkers.”

People at the Best Workplaces in Texas were more likely to say they look forward to coming to work and that they’re willing to give extra to get the job done – traits that help Roth Staffing better serve its Ambassadors (the temporary employees who represent them) and clients.

“Texans have a reputation for outsized pride in their state. At the Best Workplaces in Texas, they’re also proud of the work they do for businesses that offer high levels of camaraderie and confidence in their leaders,” said Kim Peters, Executive Vice President of Great Place to Work.

Roth is becoming a regular on Fortune’s Best Workplaces lists. Over the past year, Roth was ranked by Fortune as the #11 Best Medium Workplace (its second appearance on the list), in addition to Best Workplace lists for Recent Grads, Consulting and Professional ServicesGiving Back, and Best Workplaces for Women.

Fortune is not the only organization to take notice of Roth’s workplace culture. The organization was recently named one of Achievers 50 Most Engaged Workplaces™ in North America, and was recognized by the Stevie Awards for Great Employers as Employer of the Year. This is in addition to their sixth win from Staffing Industry Analysts for “Best Staffing Firms to Work For,” and third time being named a “Best Staffing Firm to Temp For.” Additionally, Roth Staffing Companies was recognized with the When Work Works award for its innovation in creating a flexible workplace.